The pursuit of happiness: biophilic design and why it matters

By Scott West

The pursuit of happiness: biophilic design and why it matters

By Scott West

The pursuit of happiness: biophilic design and why it matters

By Scott West

Biophilic design integrates the natural environment with the built form in an authentic way. Design Director Scott West takes a deeper look at the possibilities of biophilic design for people, and for profit.

  • 01

    Humans are hardwired for an affinity with nature

  • 02

    Biophilic design is a tonic to a highly urbanised world

  • 03

    It can lead to increased retail productivity and longer dwell times

Alain de Botton is a modern day philosopher with a knack for revealing extraordinary truths often concealed by their ordinariness. One of these is that a significant source of our happiness and misery is as a result of the environment we’re surrounded by. Dreary surroundings can feel soul-shattering, while beautiful, vital settings are “an eloquent reminder of our full potential.” De Botton wrote an entire book on this subject, The Happiness of Architecture, which I highly recommend for its approachable, thought-provoking central thesis: Where we are heavily influences who we can be.

If you’ve read any of my previous musings, you’ll know that this sounds a lot like the philosophy that guides the Frasers Property Australia approach to design and sustainability. Our touchstone is always: “Life’s best experiences are created by people connecting in memorable places.” Which for us means making places that transcend the sterility and sameness of the average cookie-cutter retail centre, and instead actively drive the design of healthy, living spaces that foster enjoyment, familiarity, togetherness and dare I say...happiness.

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